FISH

Well, what can I say about fish? Not a lot apart from the fact that they live in water obviously (except Mudskippers from the family of the Gobiidae - gobies, which are amphibious fish). I wasn't that much interested in photographing fish in the beginning, until the moment I discovered that some of them do present an interest for the macro-underwater photographer I am. Some of them because of their vivid colors, some of them because of their behavior, some of them interest me because they are a challenge to catch on photo. Boxfish can be quite colorful; gobies are super interesting, varied and often display interesting behavior. Frogfish are also part of those weird and colorful creatures that attract me so much. And the others: well if I have nothing else to shoot I love watching them, I'm in awe when a big napoleon wrasse or a shark swims by, I get chills thinking about those giant manta rays we saw in the Maldives or the gentlest of giants: the whale sharks of Donsol. Fish, big and small, are the constant and interesting background noise while I'm looking for or photographing my macro stuff.

STONOGOBIOPS NEMATODES

This goby inhabits sandy or sand-rubble bottoms adjacent to reefs at depths of from 15 to 25 metres (49 to 82 ft). It is one of several species that form commensal relationships with Randall's pistol shrimp (Alpheus randalli). Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

AMBLYPOMACENTRUS BREVICEPS

Adults inhabit lagoon and coastal areas. Found in sandy or silty areas around outcrops of rubble on sand, mud, sponge or rocks. Occur singly or in small groups. Young often with anemones for protection. Oviparous, distinct pairing during breeding. Abandoned shells and waste bottles serve as nests. Eggs are demersal and adhere to the substrate. Males guard and aerate the eggs (Fishbase) Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

SYNODUS VARIEGATUS

The variegated lizardfish is a lizardfish of the family Synodontidae found in the western Pacific and Indian Oceans, at depths from 4 to 90 m. It can reach a maximum length of 40 cm. This one is being cleaned of parasites by a cleaner shrimp. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

ECSENIUS NAMIYEI

A small shy blenny with a dark brown to charcoal grey body, a pale greyish to yellow tail, and with or without pale lines and spots on the head and body. It has four single cirri between its eyes. The yellowtail blenny usually lives on corals and sponges, hurrying into crevices and holes when disturbed. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

PARAGOBIODON XANTHOSOMA

Emerald coral gobies have a yellow to green body, head covered with tiny bristles and may have light blue spots. Usually in small groups among the branches of Pocillopora,Seriatopora and Stylophora corals of lagoon and seaward reefs in 1-10m Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

CROMILEPTES ALTIVELIS

The humpback grouper is a medium-sized fish which grows up to 70 cm. Its particular body shape makes this grouper quite impossible to mix up with other fishes. The young have a white background with round black spots and are continuously swimming head down. The adults have a body coloration with variances of grey and beige with darker blotches variable in size on the body. Small black spots cover the whole body. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

RHINOPIAS FRONDOSA

The weedy scorpionfish lives in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific Ocean, from Japan to Australia and from South Africa to the Caroline Islands. They are found in depths ranging from 13 to 90 meters. Like most Scorpaenidae, weedy scorpionfish are mostly nocturnal ambush hunters, using their camouflage to prey on unsuspecting fish and invertebrates. They rarely swim, but rather move along the bottom propelling themselves with their fins. Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

FUSIGOBIUS SIGNIPINNIS

commonly called flasher sandgoby or signal goby among various vernacular names, is a species of marine fish in the family Gobiidae. The flasher sandgoby is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the central Indo-Pacific from Indonesia to the Philippines. This sandgoby is a small sized fish, it can grow up to a size of 35 millimeters (1.4 in) length. Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

PLATAX PINNATUS

The dusky batfish are silvery with a dusky or dark bar through the eye, another through the pectoral-fin base, and yellow dorsal, anal and caudal fins. Unlike juveniles, the adults have short dorsal and anal fins. Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

DACTYLOPUS KUITERI

Dactylopus kuiteri, known commonly as the Kuiter's dragonet, is a species of marine fish in the family Callionymidae. The Kuiter's dragonet is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the central Indo-Pacific region and particularly around Indonesia. This species reaches a length of 15 centimetres (5.9 in). The specific name honours the collector and author of the Pictorial guide to Indonesian reef fishes, Rudie H. Kuiter. Found in Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

ANTENNARIUS MACULATUS

Oh my, these photoshoots are pretty boring, if you ask me.... This species of frogfish shows many colors and can slowly change from one color to another until it matches the color of the surrounding sponges or corals. Dark pigmented spots over entire body. Patches and scabs forming a saddle. Darker (or red) pigmented bars radiating from the eye. They live in shallow sheltered reefs, among algae, sponges and soft corals. Up to 20m depth. Found in Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

ATROSALARIAS HOLOMELAS

Lives among branches of live and dead corals of sheltered shallow reefs. Oviparous. Eggs are demersal and adhesive, and are attached to the substrate via a filamentous, adhesive pad or pedestal. Larvae are planktonic, often found in shallow, coastal waters . Juveniles uniformly yellowish, adults dark brown to black. Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt.

PARAGOBIODON ECHINCEPHALUS

The Redhead Goby rely on their coral host for food, shelter from predation, and breeding sites. They live in a coral singly, in pairs, or in groups, with larger coral generally hosting larger groups of fishes. Within an individual coral, only the largest two fish will breed. Redhead gobies are capable of changing sex. But unlike most sequential hermaphrodites who change sex only once during their lifetime, Redhead Goby may change sex repeatedly in either direction. Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

POMACANTHUS IMPERATOR-Edit-Edit

The emperor angelfish, Pomacanthus imperator, is a species of marine angelfish. It is a reef-associated fish, native to the Indian and Pacific Oceans, from the Red Sea to Hawaii and the Austral Islands. Juveniles are dark blue with electric blue and white rings; adults have yellow and blue stripes, with black around the eyes. It takes about 24 to 30 months for an emperor angelfish to acquire its adult coloring. They grow to 40 cm (15.75 in) in length. Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

PTEROIDICHTHYS AMBOINENSIS

Ahh, come into my eyebrows.... Lives on sandy, muddy and algae covered bottoms. Often very well camouflaged among detritus. Its body is overgrown by skinflaps, which are more prominent in males. The color can range from yellow, brown, red to pink. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

SIGNIGOBIUS BIOCELLATUS

Twin-spot Goby or Crab-eyed Goby, is a species of goby native to the Western Pacific Ocean where they can be found in areas of sand, silt in lagoons, or coastal bays with nearby cover such as rubble, coral, or leaf litter. They live at depths of from 1 to 30 meters (3.3 to 98.4 ft). This species can reach a length of 10 centimeters (3.9 in). Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

ANTENNARIUS STRIATUS

This small fish grows up to 22 cm (8.7 in) long. Like other members of its family, it has a rounded, extensible body, and its soft skin is covered with irregularly-arranged dermal spinules resembling hairs. Its large mouth is forwardly extensible, allowing it to swallow prey as large as itself. The coloring of its body is extremely variable because individual fish tend to match their living environments. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

PLEUROSICYA BOLDINGHI

The Soft Coral Goby is a small fish (it reaches a length of around 3.5 cm) that is known from Japan, New Guinea, Indonesia, and the Great Barrier Reef in Australia from depths of around 20 to 127 m. This species is commensal with soft corals of the genus Dendronephthya (commensal organisms benefit from their association with a host, but there is no associated cost to the host, as there is in the case of parasitism). Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

BRYANINOPS YONGEI

The whip coral goby has a semi-transparent head and body, with white scales running along its vertebra. Its head is reddish-brown to violet in color and the goby has pink to violet-red eyes. Their coloration is noted to match the color of the coral they inhabit. The fish is approximately 3 to 3.5 centimeters long. Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

PSEUDOBALISTES FUSCUS

The Blueline Triggerfish also known as Rippled Triggerfish is a brilliant blue colour. This fish is known for its aggressiveness and many divers choose to stay away from them, as they bite often. A beautifully colored fish as a juvenile, the Blueline Triggerfish adults tend to become belligerent in attitude and subdued in color. Nuweiba, South Sinaï, Egypt.

TOMIYAMICHTHYS SP

The Magnificent Shrimpgoby lives in symbiosis with the red and white coloured Randall’s Alpheid Shrimp. They live at depths from 15 to 40m. They have a dark body with pale spots and bars. The first dorsal fin is a huge orange or gray fan-shaped sail with dark markings. The tail is also big and is orange fan-shaped with blue lines radiating from tail to base. This one had his burrow at about 30 m depth. Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines

ANTENNARIUS STRIATUS

The hairy frogfish grows up to 22 cm long. The coloring of its body is extremely variable because individual fish tend to match their living environments. Frogfishes have the capacity to change coloration and pigment pattern, taking only a few weeks to adapt. This one is angling for its food with the lure on its head. Sabang, Puerto Galera, Mindoro Oriental, Philippines.

ANTENNARIUS STRIATUS

This striated frogfish grows up to 22 cm (8.7 in) long. The coloring of its body is extremely variable because individual fish tend to match their living environments. Frogfishes have the capacity to change coloration and pigment pattern, taking only a few weeks to adapt. Body and fins can be marked with roughly parallel dark stripes or elongated blotches, some with rays radiating outward from the eye. Anilao, South Luzon, Philippines.

SARGOCENTRON RUBRUM

Sargocentron rubrum, also known as redcoat, is a member of the family Holocentridae of the order Beryciformes. Squirrelfish in general are large, active, nocturnal fish, which are usually red in color. It is found in the Indian Ocean, from the Red Sea to the West Pacific, where it ranges from southern Japan to New Caledonia and New South Wales, Australia. Recently recorded also in Tonga. It invaded the eastern Mediterranean via the Suez Canal. Beirut, Lebanon

PARAGOBIODON XANTHOSOMA

Emerald coral gobies have a yellow to green body, head covered with tiny bristles and may have light blue spots. Usually in small groups among the branches of Pocillopora,Seriatopora and Stylophora corals of lagoon and seaward reefs in 1-10m Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

OXYCIRRHITES TYPUS

The longnose hawkfish, Oxycirrhites typus, is a species of hawkfish found on tropical reefs of the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, where it can be found at depths around 10 to 100 m (33 to 328 ft). It prefers the steep outer slopes of the reefs amongst gorgonians and black corals. This species can reach 13 cm (5.1 in) in total length. (Wikipedia) Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

AROTHRON MAPPA

The map puffer can grow up to 65 cm length. Its body is oval shape and the skin is not covered with scales. Its snout is short with two pairs of nostrils and its mouth is terminal with four strong teeth. This juvenile doesn’t have the specific coloration yet and displays an array of white dots. It lives close to reef drop-off and sheltered lagoons from the surface to 30 m depth. It is generally uncommon and solitary. Sabang Puerto Galera, Mindoro Oriental, Philippines

PSEUDANTHIAS SQUAMIPINNIS

The sea goldie or scalefin anthias is found in the western Indian Ocean including the Red Sea, and in the Pacific Ocean as far east as Japan and southeast Australia. The sea goldie feeds primarily on zooplankton. Like other anthias, the sea goldie is a protogynous hermaphrodite; a male retains a harem of five to 10 females, but when the male dies, one of the females will undergo sex reversal and take the place of the missing male. Ecsenius frontalis, known commonly as the Smooth-fin blenny. It is found in coral reefs in the western Indian ocean, in several gulfs in the Red Sea. It can reach a maximum length of 8 centimetres. Blennies in this species primarily feed off of plants, including benthic algae and weeds. Nuweiba, Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

ECHIDNA NEBULOSA

The clouded moray among many various vernacular names, is a species of marine fish of the family Muraenidae. It is widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific area from the eastern coast of Africa throughout Micronesia including the Red Sea and Hawaii. This species reaches a length of 100 centimetres (39 in) but its common size is 50 centimetres (20 in). It lives at depths of between 2 and 30 metres (7 and 100 ft). Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

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